Wild Garlic Flaky Flatbreads

Wild-Garlic-Flatbreads

Wild Garlic Flaky Flatbreads.

These delicious flatbreads will go with so many types of meals, they’re perfect with soups, broths, stews, curries, for dipping in hummus, wrapped round fillings for lunch…

And they are so simple! There’s no yeast, no resting, simply make the three ingredient dough, roll out the flatbreads and fry!

I’ve laced these flatbreads with wild garlic – freshly picked for free from wild–, it gives them a wonderful savouriness. If you can’t get hold of wild garlic then chopped chives would be a perfect replacement.

Wild garlic grows in abundance in spring, its graceful leaves scenting the air with the heady smell of garlic and the pretty white flowers dancing in the breeze.

It’s a woodland plant and I found plenty growing in the woodland at the back of the property we are looking after, the wild garlic among the spring bluebells.

Wild garlic – or Allium Ursinum: bear garlic – is pretty easy to identify, especially when it is in flower. If you really want to be sure, tear off a piece of leaf and crush between your fingers, it should give off a pungent garlicy smell.

Pick the leaves, selecting plants that are ideally on a slope (wild garlic loves growing on slopes) and away from where dogs may have peed!

These flatbreads are super flaky, the dough is rolled out thin then a little butter is brushed over it and sprinkled with shredded wild garlic. Then it’s rolled up like a cigar and coiled up, this creates the wonderful layers that will give you the flakiness. A second roll out turns it into a flatbread, fry it then serve it!

Wild Garlic Flatbreads

Melted butter gives the flatbread great flavour but you could totally make them vegan with melted vegan spread or simply use sunflower oil.

I’m deeply in love with these flatbreads, they are perfect for camper van meals (I made them in my van) and they really don’t take long to make. They remind me a lot of indian parathas, those delicious flaky roti, and they really are good with curry.

I would say I make a version of these – sometimes plain, sometimes with herbs – at least once a week. When I’ve been house sitting with an Aga, they are absolutely fabulous cooked directly on the simmering plate, close the lid while they cook!

Wild Garlic Flaky Flatbreads.

Feel free to swap the wild garlic with chives or other herbs, but hey: its free and abundant when in season!

  • 5 or 6 wild garlic leaves
  • 50 g butter, melted
  • 200 g plain flour plus plenty more for rolling out
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 150 ml warm water
  • 1-2 tbsp oil to fry in

Give the wild garlic a through wash. I strip out the thick leaf stem then stack the leaves and roll them up like a cigar before finely shredding them with a sharp knife. Set aside while you prepare the dough.

Combine the salt and the flour in a mixing bowl and add half the melted butter.

Pour in around 100 mls of the warm water and begin to bring everything together with your hands, adding more water if you need to, to get to a soft dough that’s slightly sticky. Use a bit more flour if it’s too sticky.

The dough should leave the bowl pretty clean. Tip out onto a flour-dusted work surface and knead for about 1 minute to give the dough a stretch, it should feel smooth and plump.

Divide the dough into six equal pieces, shaping briefly into rough balls in between your palms.

Take one dough ball and roll it out very thinly, I find a small rolling pin is better for this and be quite generous with the dusting of flour when you roll out so that it doesn’t stick.

Lightly brush a little of the remaining melted butter over it and sprinkle on a sixth of the shredded wild garlic.

Now roll it up into a long tube then coil it around itself like a pinwheel.

Squash it slightly with the palm of your hand then set it aside with you repeat the process with the rest of the dough.

Take one dough pinwheel and roll out, again dusting the work surface with flour, to a disk about 5 mm in thickness.

Add a tablespoon or so of oil to what’s left, if anything, in the butter dish.

Shake off any loose flour and brush one side lightly with oil.

Heat your frying pan over a medium to high heat. Place the flatbread oil-side down into the pan and fry for a minute or two until air bubbles begin appear on the surface and it takes on a golden colour on the underside.

Brush a little more oil over the surface then flip it over and cook the other side until golden.

Repeat with the rest of the pinwheels, serve while still warm. They should be a little bit crisp and very flaky.

If you want to make them a little in advance, you could reheat them in a hot oven, wrap the stack in tin foil. Alternately, re-fry them in a dry frying pan.

Wild Garlic Flaky Flatbreads
A quick flatbread made without yeast, flavoured with wild garlic.
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Ingredients
  1. 5 or 6 wild garlic leaves
  2. 50 g butter, melted
  3. 200 g plain flour plus plenty more for rolling out
  4. 1/2 tsp sea salt
  5. 150 ml warm water
  6. 1-2 tbsp oil to fry in
Instructions
  1. Give the wild garlic a through wash. Strip out the thick leaf stem then stack the leaves and roll them up like a cigar before finely shredding them with a sharp knife. Set aside while you prepare the dough.
  2. Combine the salt and the flour in a mixing bowl and add half the melted butter.
  3. Pour in around 100 mls of the warm water and begin to bring everything together with your hands, adding more of the water if you need to, to get to a soft dough that’s slightly sticky. Use a bit more flour if it’s too sticky.
  4. The dough should leave the bowl pretty clean. Tip out onto a flour-dusted work surface and knead for about 1 minute to give the dough a stretch, it should feel smooth and plump.
  5. Divide the dough into six equal pieces, shaping briefly into rough balls in between your palms.
  6. Take one dough ball and roll it out very thinly, I find a small rolling pin is better for this and be quite generous with the dusting of flour when you roll out so that it doesn’t stick.
  7. Lightly brush a little of the remaining melted butter over it and sprinkle on a sixth of the shredded wild garlic.
  8. Now roll it up into a long tube then coil it around itself like a pinwheel.
  9. Squash it slightly with the palm of your hand then set it aside with you repeat the process with the rest of the dough.
  10. Take one dough pinwheel and roll out, again dusting the work surface with flour, to a disk about 5 mm in thickness.
  11. Add a tablespoon or so of oil to what’s left, if anything, in the butter dish.
  12. Shake off any loose flour and brush one side lightly with oil.
  13. Heat your frying pan over a medium to high heat. Place the flatbread oil-side down into the pan and fry for a minute or two until air bubbles begin appear on the surface and it takes on a golden colour on the underside.
  14. Brush a little more oil over the surface then flip it over and cook the other side until golden.
  15. Repeat with the rest of the pinwheels, serve while still warm. They should be a little bit crisp and very flaky.
Notes
  1. Replace the wild garlic with finely chopped chives, or you can even omit the herbs altogether for a plain flaky flatbread.
Vagabond Baker http://vagabondbaker.com/
Wild Garlic Flatbreads

What do you love serving flatbread with? Have you ever cooked with wild garlic before?

By Rachel A Davis   Follow on Bloglovin

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4 Responses

  1. These look so delicious Rachel! Like you say, they remind me a lot of the parathas my mum makes but I’ve never tried it with garlic – what a lovely little touch! And they sound pretty simple too ☺
    Shikha (whywasteannualleave) recently posted…The Animals on Safari at Selous Game Reserve, Tanzania – Honeymoon MemoriesMy Profile

    • Rachel Davis says:

      yes Shikha! You should have a go at making them. That convo we had a Traverse about making bread, well this is a great introduction to how dough should feel and it is very simple with few ingredients!
      I crave parathas, I bet your mum has an amazing recipe!

  2. Gin says:

    Hmm I love garlic so much, and garlic bread is no exception ! It makes me think about the naan bread.
    Gin recently posted…Backpacking Southeast Asia: Expectations Vs. RealityMy Profile

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